Category Archives: Research and Reflection

Contextual focus point : Frank Auerbach’s portraiture

 

Frank Auerbach’s approach to portraiture is legendary and through it he makes some very interesting points about the nature of portraiture and of drawing. Research what makes Frank Auerbach’s portraits unique, and how he used the passage of time in them. Think about why he might have done that and make notes about how working from life differs from working from a photograph in terms of the way we experience the time spent.

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/frank-auerbach-676

 

Frank Auerbach was born in Berlin but at the age of just 7 was relocated to London during the WW2 as part of the kinder transport, he never saw his parents again. At a very young age he experienced a great loss and reality of bombed out London – the ruins, fire, devastation, rubble. All this has a profound effect on him as a person as well as an artist. Broken lines, thick paint. textured surface and unfinished lines. On first impression i felt that his work is a continuous replica of visual reality and inner experiences through the manner of paint application and the use of line – he is trying to capture the changing world as it goes by in a series of overlapped marks and textures.

Auerbach is a prolific painter – he paints every day and produces a great number of works but his subjects are mainly the same – part of North London near his studio and a small number of close friend and family , for example he has been painting his wife for over 60 years. Each work is a continued process of revision and reworking – corrections, more paint, scraping off the previous attempts , changes of an angle and so on. Due to this way of working  most of his work takes a very long time to complete. While in earlier works he over-painted previous attempts his practice changed later, now he scrapes everything off and works anew.

His drawings are a collection  of dancing marks that create a visual vibration – the way he created volume and shape on his portraits reminded me of “blind drawings”  where the mark on support is created while the other hand explores the surface of the face, working together to express touch through line. In his case the marks created in direct coordination with what he sees during the time spent with the sitter.

So why did he choose to paint this way?   It seems to me that through continuous takes of the same features he is trying to “find” the real persona. His choice of poses – not usual but rather observed from a distance – tell me that it is not the likeness of features to be captured but the movement and changes that occurs to the sitter. His work is not planned or visualised in advance but is build during the time spent – his marks and immediacy of application, even reworked, is like a process of capturing time and a fleeting moment.

The complexity of his painting demand a closer look and lead to many questions – the more you look at the painting the more you can see. Time he spends on one work, sometimes hundreds of hours, accumulates in very strong images that to some extend can be compared to a movie or many photographs that overlaid in one one still shot.

I feel that working in this way allows him to become one with the subject and inserts a piece of himself in the work. Spending a lot of time with his sitters helps him to dig deeper and reveal the real person – not just a flesh but feel below the surface, reveal and capture experience they share and bring the portrait to life.

Comparing this method to working with a photograph demonstrates the difference in total experience during the process and the connection that can arouse between the sitter and the artist. It is not possible to capture all the conversations and experiences that happened during the process but allows the artist to become one with the sitter and explore the changes that occur between the takes. The result is not just a picture you saw but the accumulation of time, connection, experiences and emotions between two individuals.

On a personal note, I have come across his work before, a few years back, and can see how my perception changed. I feel that now i understand a lot more of what artist wants to say through his work and found a closer connection with the process as well as the final portraits. While personally i prefer his drawings because i am drawn to the line and marks he makes I can not stop looking at his painting. They feel alive and even though some stir  uneasy feelings in me upon viewing, i appreciate the time that went into the making of each as well as undeniable feeling of movement and presence of captured time in each.

Below are a few of his works:

 

Self Portrait Frank Auerbach, self portrait 1994-2002; https://www.artfund.org/supporting-museums/art-weve-helped-buy/artwork/8497/self-portrait

 

Frank Auerbach, portrait of David Landau; http://www.artnet.com/artists/frank-auerbach/?sort=12

Head of Catherine Lampert, 2003–2004

Frank Auerbach., Head of Catherine Lampert; http://www.artnet.com/artists/frank-auerbach/3?sort=12

Frank Auerbach, Portrait of Julia; http://totallyhistory.com/frank-auerbach/

Frank auerbach, Head of Gerda Boehm; http://totallyhistory.com/frank-auerbach-paintings/

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

 

 

 

 

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/frank-auerbach/auerbach-introduction

http://www.artnet.com/artists/frank-auerbach/

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/aug/29/frank-auerbach-painters-painter-freud-tate-retrospective

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/frank-auerbach-the-fearless-portrait-brixton-summer-sessions-tickets-65458773955

Frank Auerbach

 

 

 

Project 3 A finer focus. research point

Gwen Hardie – born an educated in Scotland. She uses oil paint and spends no more than a day on her large scale paintings of magnifications of skin lit by a natural light that resemble the light effect found in landscape. She uses the canvass and oil paint to create an illusion of three dimensional space that appears to moves and resembles the outer skin layer.

  image sourse: http://gwenhardie.com/tondos/

Here is one of the videos where her work can be seen on display https://vimeo.com/89131614

I definitely can relate to the idea of magnification – i found it interesting how she explores the same subject in different formats and as a series ( from pores to medical skin conditions etc).  It would be great to see her work close up to get a better understanding of her techniques and experience the “movement” she trying to portray.

 

Richard Wright – born in London, best known for his large scale intricate drawing on walls , glass and buildings. His work sometimes only lasts during the exhibition , temporary art, and then is painted over. His work explores and changes the space it occupies during the installation. He incorporates gold leaf into his work and uses old master techniques as well as intricately designed geometric patterns.

In his interview he mentions that he often looks for a “problem” area ( difficult) and tries to find the solution how his work will change it ( paraphrasing here) – i quite like this incite into how the artist picks his spaces, i can see how this process of changing/modifying the “canvass” works as important part of the whole.

 

Greyson Perry – British artist , work in a variety of media , well known for his ceramics with scenery/themed drawings. He enjoys “doodling” and tries to do it as often as possible for “fun” and generation of ideas. I find “doodling” very helpful, relaxing and feel that it can help to loosen up, lead to unexpected results and be very helpful in generating a starting point.

Paul Noble – British sculptor and draughtsman, best know for his extended over 15 years project “Nobson Newtown” – a series of drawings where he acted as an engineer, creator, architect to portray an imaginary city. His work is very detail and i was really impressed with the sheer number of elements that can be found ones i started looking closer. In the video below some of the works can be seen ( i used a pause button) as well as a short incite into artists working process.

 

Stephen Walter – Londoner that captures his native city’s life, events and history in mapped drawings. His work is highly detailed and annotated using words, symbols and keys. The symbols are not as those one can find in a usual map but personalised and sometimes humorous – from “areas to avoid because of dangerous dogs” to ” great palaces to have a quiet drink” (paraphrasing here). As he explained in his interview (link below) it took him around 1.5 years to complete. Starting with a projection of old city maps the drawing progressed through careful research online, books and personal visits to many places. His maps are record of historical events that happened to the place as well as his personal experiences.. He said in the video ” it is a map of shared history and the piece that acts as a mirror onto the viewer” – i can see how individual the response can be because we all experience different emotions and get involved into different activities in the same place. .

The level of detail in such a drawing leads to a more careful exploration, involvement with the work on deeper level and physical engagement creating a unique experience of discovery.

in Video below he explains about his London map http://www.bl.uk/magnificentmaps/map4.html

 

 

References: http://gwenhardie.com/

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Richard-Wright-British-artist

https://www.artsy.net/artwork/richard-wright-no-title-2

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/richard-wright-5905

https://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/grayson_perry.htm

https://gagosian.com/exhibitions/2007/paul-noble-dot-to-dot/

http://www.tagfinearts.com/stephen-walter.html

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/may/10/stephen-walter-artist-map-maker-london-interview

 

 

 

 

 

Project 2 An Artist’s book, research point

Research artist’s books as a form of artistic practice.

 

Hans Peter Feldmann – German visual artist. He collects images, items and creates various books to represent an idea, time or experience. A lot of his books do not contain any text apart from the title – this in a way makes work speak for itself and allows the viewer to experience visual imagery as they see it. This books do not form a basis for a further exploration/work but are works in  themselves. Here are some of the works he has created throughout the years http://artistsbooks.info/AB_Feldmann%20Hans-Peter.html

https://www.artbook.com/catalog–photography–monographs–feldmann–hans-peter.html

 

Wolfgang Tillmans – is a fine art photographer. He creates full room photo installations, video notes as well as books that contain imagery on a particular subject or idea. Such as architecture and how it changes according to space we take over to fit our needs; global changes and how things change over the period of time. His work on changes of car headlines – becoming more angular,  suggests a rise in competitiveness and predatory tactics to gain what we want. What i liked about his work is that it allows the viewer to  experience ordinary imagery on our own level but see closer and perhaps find angles/connections with subject that were not noticed or overlooked before.

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/wolfgang-tillmans-2017/room-guide-2017

https://davidzwirnerbooks.com/artists/artist/wolfgang-tillmans

 

Sol de Witt – well know for his geometric patterns, lines, curves and collaborations where other people create works that he initiated. He also is one of the pioneers  in the artist’s book being recognised as an art form in itself. His works were organised into books where one would explore variety of lines, arcs, patterns,colours etc.

https://www.artbook.com/9788890345920.html

Sol Lewitt. Artist’s Books

https://www.wallpaper.com/art/sol-lewitt-artists-books

Eileen Hogan – English painter and book artist. She uses her interest in lettering as drawings and uses words as a connection between imagery and words. Her book tell a story of a particular subject or an event, through a collection of related images – such as sketches/painting over a period of time or during a making of a painting. she also created digital books where one can scroll through the images on screen rather than by flipping the pages, along with the sounds and videos that generate personal experience for the viewer. I found this quite an interesting idea ( combination of image and sound) – it makes one see for themselves but also get an incite from the artist.

https://www.tate.org.uk/about-us/projects/transforming-artist-books/digital-books

Home

Henry Matisse‘s book “Jazz” was created/started when he became ill. The book contains of his cut outs, collages and notes made by the artist. He used different techniques ( screen printing, stencelling eyc) to create his images for the book. In the video below on the 40th minute the curator shows and talks a bit about the book.

Dayanta Singh – a photographer, mainly working in black and white. What i liked about her work and idea is that she wants to change space with her images, be able to influence the experience and be part of it rather than it being static. She creates her books/installations and moves them around each time creating a new set up/experience and impact. She says in the video ” the book is a tactile, very private experience” and i so agree with her, nothing can take away the feeling of going through the pages, feeling the weight and listening to pages turned..

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/videos/tateshots/dayanita-singh-i-use-photography-transform-space

 

I’ve researched further into the variations of artist’s book and was really surprised at the vast variety and formats that there are. It really opened up my thinking of how works could be displayed, collected, stored, presented, experienced, viewed and so on. The ingenuity and craftsmanship of some artists/craftsmen is just mind blowing. This is something to explore further and enjoy as the time goes by – what can be better that looking through something you’ve made yourself and re-experiencing works that may have been just pushed under the cupboard.

Also the artist book is not just a sketchbook or a collection of images it is a work in itself, depending on the subject/inserts the book can tel it’s own story to each individual person viewing it. They can be purely imagery or contain a few words, or only words and perhaps just the blank pages but the time that went into making one will talk through the pages and grant a different experience every time.

ome of the articles about artist’s books and the divercity

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/a/books-artists/

https://nmwa.org/learn/library-archives/artist-books

http://www.angelalorenzartistsbooks.com/whatis.htm

https://www.otis.edu/library/artists-books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project 3 Research point:

Research point:

“Many artists use installative drawings and what these artists are doing positions the viewer or audience member in a totally different way to someone viewing a work on the wall contained within a frame.

Using the link below, look at the work curated for On Line, an exhibition of contemporary drawing held in Edinburgh in 2010. Look particularly at the section entitled ‘line extension’ which discusses the work of Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Ellsworth Kelly, Karel Malich, Edward Krasinski and Pierrette Bloch:” http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/

Line extension section presented works that use line to extend beyond flat surface of support into the 3D space we occupy.

I am familiar with some of the artists and their work that feature in this exhibition.

Personally i’m quite a fan of Alexander Calder’s wire works – he uses linear qualities of wire to place the drawing into the space away/out of the flat surface of paper. Added movement creates visual interest and in a way makes line appear as if it is in a process of being constantly drawn/changing.

A Calder,  Calder room at National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Ellsworth Kelly – uses automatism and gesture often while not looking at the support – this creates lively markings , to my eye they resemble moving branches that could be seen on a large tree or grasses in the wind. Spontaneity and unpredictability of resulted marks appear still moving. In a way his use of gesture is similar to the Way Pollock used paint while immersed in the process of creating his canvasses.

some works by E. Kelly https://www.moma.org/collection/works/37190?artist_id=3048&locale=en&page=1&sov_referrer=artist

 

Robert Rauschenberg – his work quite close to me personally , especially the idea of using “found” or recycled materials. His pioneering Technics of combining painting/drawing with performance art , as example where he used car to draw it’s tire marks, opened up new possibilities and doors into the idea  “we can do anything” in a name of art.

Automobile tire print : https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/#works/02/49

Edward Krasinsky – his work was new to me but i found it exiting, as the idea of “leaving” the plain of the flat surface is quite similar to what i’m exploring at the moment.

https://frieze.com/article/edward-krasinski-2

Pierette Bloch (June 16, 1928 – July 7, 2017, french), . Why is she described as using “poor materials” and what do you think her materials lend to her subject matter?

Looking at her work makes me think she was very much interested in mark making and expressing the qualities of line by using materials that mimic it’s qualities. Why to use “poor”materials ? Sometimes the simplicity of material can capture momentum and imply the moment our eye sees the object , we can make out everything else later. I think her background in textiles led to the use of singular strands of horse hair, wire, thread, inks, paper – they found life of their own out of the whole piece delivering “simple” but striking result at the same time. Also she is being referred to as a modest person, as example she mostly signed her works on the back, and this perhaps was her way of relating to works produced.

image source http://fryderyk.canalblog.com/archives/2013/03/11/26592960.html

Her works are mostly in black and white, linear and appear moving in space while remaining static at the same time. I particularly liked Horse hair and wire pieces – i can imagine that the hair move as the viewer comes close or walks by. The elegant twirls and knots create ever changing line that in it’s simplicity takes over the space it’s occupying.

Some of her work reminded me of works by Russian installation artist Dmitri Gutov, in particular work where he uses fishing line. In an example below he used line attached to walls with dust particles tied to them.  I found this project fascinating and it captivated my imagination when i heard of it.

To what extent would you say that this piece by Louise Bourgeois is a drawing?”

( i could not find the image that is in the course materials, but the one below is similar)

image source: https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/fc-555/

She uses theme of spiders throughout and has a lot of drawings using hard media to very fluid paint. Also she has produced a series of sculptures where she plays with scale and materials. To me , the answer to the question is – i think it is a sculptured drawing that found it’s way from flat 2D support and emerged as a 3D object that fills the space and interacts with the viewer on a different level. I feel that material and the linear qualities play role of drawing in space/air rather than being on a paper surface.

 

References:

https://frieze.com/article/pierrette-bloch

http://www.artnet.com/artists/pierrette-bloch/

https://vernissage.tv/2011/01/10/pierrette-bloch-retrospective-at-galerie-karsten-greve-paris/

http://www.gutov.ru/install/dust.htm

https://galerie-karsten-greve.com/en/pierrette_bloch/works/paperworks#1

http://www.artcritical.com/2009/05/11/pierrette-bloch-at-haim-chanin/

https://www.artsy.net/artist/louise-bourgeois?medium=*&page=1&sort=-decayed_merch&price_range=*-*

https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/louise-bourgeois-spiders/

https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/fc-555/

https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/98.193.A-E/

https://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/work-week-maman-louise-bourgeois

https://frieze.com/article/edward-krasinski-2

https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/#works/02/66

Project 3. Installation

Method: Make a drawing that relates to its environment in a way that creates an interesting dynamic between the artwork and the space around it.

For this project i used my garden and tried to add drawing that would fit in, interact and can be a part of it  at least temporarily.

 

1. My shadow outline on the shed/studio space. Here i used my shadow and charcoal to “imprint” my outline on the space i occupy while working on the course.

It would have been easier and more accurate copy if someone else drew it , but i found it more interesting to do it myself – the shadow kept moving as a drew using charcoal. NOw everytime i walk by i smile and feel more connected to the space i use.

 

2. Shadows of the roses.

 

Using charcoal i drew over, trying to capture the essence rather than accurate contours of, the rose bushes. As clouds moved and wind moved the branches so did the shadow, this added more interest , in my opinion, to the end result.

first

two with a big shadow two with a smaller shadow two without a shadow

Video of how the drawing looks while sun creates shadows.

 

What i like about this “interaction” is that when the sun creates shadows the drawing is almost invisible, but when overcast the drawing becomes the shadow itself. Also i felt this fitted in really well as when asked my family did not see it until i pointed out, and that was exactly what i wanted – lines became part of the surrounding.

 

3. Going along the Lines with blending in i wanted to make a wire drawing that would fit with the dried grass and still bare branches, but one that would have a movement. While working on assignment 4 ( horse) i used Leonardo’s horse drawing as a model and shaped a piece of green wire into a horse head. I left just enough length to create a spring, and some more to be able to attach this around the garden. The movement created by wind and the spring in the wire resembles the motion of horse feeding in the field.

The static images – quite hard to see as the wire blends in with the surrounding lines of grasses – which is what i wanted, as this adds inconspicuously to the surroundings almost becoming one.

Here it is attached to the fence near the “wild garden” patch and some fire wood, short  videos below show the motion as if the horse eating.

 

 

Here the head was attached to the tree, giving it a linear body. and  short video below

Here it is grazing on some herbs, attached to the cut down oak tree, and a short video

 

Here i have put it in to the stable – attached it to the fence, as if it is peaking out before the bed time.

 

I totally enjoyed this experience, and my mum really loved the horse grazing in the garden, which is quite uplifting.

I feel that overall ideas for this projects have potential to be bolder or larger but they have worked in the space i chose. The charcoal shadows blend in and almost unnoticeable doing exactly what they were planned for – be a part of the whole. The wire head gave some smiles to a few people who seen it in motion and i enjoyed taking it out for a graze around the garden. The wire mimics lines that can be seen around it and in a way grows out of the thing it is attached to.


Research point:

“Many artists use installative drawings and what these artists are doing positions the viewer or audience member in a totally different way to someone viewing a work on the wall contained within a frame.

Using the link below, look at the work curated for On Line, an exhibition of contemporary drawing held in Edinburgh in 2010. Look particularly at the section entitled ‘line extension’ which discusses the work of Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, Ellsworth Kelly, Karel Malich, Edward Krasinski and Pierrette Bloch:” http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/

Line extension section presented works that use line to extend beyond flat surface of support into the 3D space we occupy.

I am familiar with some of the artists and their work that feature in this exhibition.

Personally i’m quite a fan of Alexander Calder’s wire works – he uses linear qualities of wire to place the drawing into the space away/out of the flat surface of paper. Added movement creates visual interest and in a way makes line appear as if it is in a process of being constantly drawn/changing.

A Calder,  Calder room at National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Ellsworth Kelly – uses automatism and gesture often while not looking at the support – this creates lively markings , to my eye they resemble moving branches that could be seen on a large tree or grasses in the wind. Spontaneity and unpredictability of resulted marks appear still moving. In a way his use of gesture is similar to the Way Pollock used paint while immersed in the process of creating his canvasses.

some works by E. Kelly https://www.moma.org/collection/works/37190?artist_id=3048&locale=en&page=1&sov_referrer=artist

 

Robert Rauschenberg – his work quite close to me personally , especially the idea of using “found” or recycled materials. His pioneering Technics of combining painting/drawing with performance art , as example where he used car to draw it’s tire marks, opened up new possibilities and doors into the idea  “we can do anything” in a name of art.

Automobile tire print : https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/#works/02/49

Edward Krasinsky – his work was new to me but i found it exiting, as the idea of “leaving” the plain of the flat surface is quite similar to what i’m exploring at the moment.

https://frieze.com/article/edward-krasinski-2

Pierette Bloch (June 16, 1928 – July 7, 2017, french), . Why is she described as using “poor materials” and what do you think her materials lend to her subject matter?

Looking at her work makes me think she was very much interested in mark making and expressing the qualities of line by using materials that mimic it’s qualities. Why to use “poor”materials ? Sometimes the simplicity of material can capture momentum and imply the moment our eye sees the object , we can make out everything else later. I think her background in textiles led to the use of singular strands of horse hair, wire, thread, inks, paper – they found life of their own out of the whole piece delivering “simple” but striking result at the same time. Also she is being referred to as a modest person, as example she mostly signed her works on the back, and this perhaps was her way of relating to works produced.

image source http://fryderyk.canalblog.com/archives/2013/03/11/26592960.html

Her works are mostly in black and white, linear and appear moving in space while remaining static at the same time. I particularly liked Horse hair and wire pieces – i can imagine that the hair move as the viewer comes close or walks by. The elegant twirls and knots create ever changing line that in it’s simplicity takes over the space it’s occupying.

Some of her work reminded me of works by Russian installation artist Dmitri Gutov, in particular work where he uses fishing line. In an example below he used line attached to walls with dust particles tied to them.  I found this project fascinating and it captivated my imagination when i heard of it.

 

To what extent would you say that this piece by Louise Bourgeois is a drawing?”

( i could not find the image that is in the course materials, but the one below is similar)

image source: https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/fc-555/

She uses theme of spiders throughout and has a lot of drawings using hard media to very fluid paint. Also she has produced a series of sculptures where she plays with scale and materials. To me , the answer to the question is – i think it is a sculptured drawing that found it’s way from flat 2D support and emerged as a 3D object that fills the space and interacts with the viewer on a different level. I feel that material and the linear qualities play role of drawing in space/air rather than being on a paper surface.

 

References:

https://frieze.com/article/pierrette-bloch

http://www.artnet.com/artists/pierrette-bloch/

https://vernissage.tv/2011/01/10/pierrette-bloch-retrospective-at-galerie-karsten-greve-paris/

http://www.gutov.ru/install/dust.htm

https://galerie-karsten-greve.com/en/pierrette_bloch/works/paperworks#1

http://www.artcritical.com/2009/05/11/pierrette-bloch-at-haim-chanin/

https://www.artsy.net/artist/louise-bourgeois?medium=*&page=1&sort=-decayed_merch&price_range=*-*

https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/louise-bourgeois-spiders/

https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/fc-555/

https://www.sfmoma.org/artwork/98.193.A-E/

https://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/work-week-maman-louise-bourgeois

https://frieze.com/article/edward-krasinski-2

https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/online/#works/02/66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contextual focus point: Emily Kame Kngwarreye

 

“Whole lot, that’s whole lot, Awelye (my Dreaming), Arlatyeye (pencil yam), Arkerrthe (mountain devil lizard), Ntange (grass seed), Tingu (Dreamtime pup), Ankerre (emu), Intekwe (favourite food of emus, a small plant), Atnwerle (green bean), and Kame (yam seed). That’s what I paint, whole lot. ” 1990  when asked to explain about her work and what she paints; Emily Kame Kngwarreye (b. about 1910 -d. 1996)

Watching her work I had a feeling of how much she connected to each piece and the meaning that was put into it. She is quite a remarkable person – starting to paint in her later years she managed to reach across her lands into the world and touch many with her art.

She grew up  in a remote desert area known as Utopia, hundreds of kilometres away from the modern world and had no formal art education.  She drew inspiration from the surrounding environment and local history, holy places/objects and ancestral history. It is possible to say she captured the air and life around her in the paintings she produced. Her work has it’s roots in traditional ceremonial art and also works that were produced for everyday purposes such as decorations, clothing patterns, body painting setc.

While watching some of the YouTube clips I’ve noticed how immersed she was in her work and totally connected to the earth, air and the story she was portraying. She used canvass, wood, silk and anything available . A lot of her work has quite a large size , which is quite impressive, providing that she was quite prolific and during 8 years has painted almost 3000 works sometimes producing on a daily basis.

It is possible to find similarities in her work and works of impressionists, expressionists and contemporary abstractions – of course she had no visual interactions with those movements during her upbringing. This is one of the reasons she took the art world by storm almost overnight – raw talent, visual euphoria and so in line with the time.

In 1977 Emily was introduced to the Batik-making through a government funded educational program this is where the materials she used later entered her life.
Batik-making is introduced to women in Utopia as part of an extended government-funded education program. This is the beginning of Emily’s use of introduced materials in her art. In 1988-89 she started using acrylics on canvass while working with  Utopian women’s Batic group on a project for a CAAMA shop. This is when her first Painting on canvass was completed and instantly attracted attention, from here  demand and success of her work escalates.

Emu woman, 1988-89, 92x61cm, synthetic polymer on canvass

Image source:  https://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/utopia_the_genius_of_emily_kame_kngwarreye/origins

In a lot of her she uses repetitive lines, dots, designs that “mimic” ceremonial body paintings – but in a innovative and free style. She used gesture and whole body movement , as if dancing, or sat on the ground literally connected to the work that was painted. She captured the movement, traditions, dreams and life she knew and shared it with the world.

Alalgura – my country in bloom,1992; 122x303x5cm; synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Image source: https://www.mca.com.au/artists-works/works/2015.5/

Above work, she uses dotted patterns and colours to represent the fertility of her country and how it spring into life after hot summer storms, when seeds swirl in the air and begin a new life in a new place.

She celebrated and expressed nature through her paintings where she tried to portray her Aboriginal Dreaming – traditional stories, spiritual beliefs of her ancestors and relationship her people have with the land they live in.

I found it quite remarkable how Her style of working have changed,  – she explored colour, pattern, line, drawing and application. From minute dots representing seeds, yams to expressive body painting pattern that women have for the ceremonies and later going towards lines or just  pure colour patterns, small dots to large dots, straight lines to curved patterns and vise versa.  Below is a small video showing some of her works and story about her career/life

 

 

 

Thinking about the importance of  place and belonging in terms of my own work I feel that inevitably my life experience adds to the direction i take.  We have moved a few times and lived in different countries – this has some advantages , as it opens the horizon and allowed me to experience variety of cultures, religions and environments. The sense of place play a significant part in my life – at the moment most of my inspiration comes directly from where i live, but i do find myself digging into my past more often than i realised.

References:

https://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/utopia_the_genius_of_emily_kame_kngwarreye/emily_kame_kngwarreye

https://www.mca.com.au/artists-works/artists/emily-kame-kngwarreye/

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/1999/05/kng-m07.html

https://nga.gov.au/exhibitions/kngwarreye/teachers.htm

https://nga.gov.au/exhibitions/kngwarreye/teachers.htm

 

 

 

Artists to look at for my parallel project

Tom friedman – installations, sculptures, site specific, everyday materials ,  etc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Friedman_(artist)

https://www.artsy.net/artist/tom-friedman?page=1&sort=-partner_updated_at

http://www.stephenfriedman.com/artists/tom-friedman

Good video:

https://www.saatchigallery.com/aipe/tom_friedman.htm

 

 

Kandinskiy’s use of colour

 

Rudy earnst – action painting, magnification and distortion of objects (painting/drawing), use of variety of materials and media, found materials , scupting, installation) Bauhaus links ( The German term Bauhaus—literally “building house”—was understood as meaning “School of Building”, from wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus )

 

http://www.rudyernst.com/about-2/ his website and bio

4. https://www.lacanauphotographie.com/  Russel Scott-Skinner free form artist inspired by Henri Moor

https://www.youtube.com/user/ArtistRScottSkinner/videos?sort=dd&shelf_id=0&view=0

5. Joshue Elias – very interesting OIL paint application, colour pallet and techniques. Abstract with an idea? real physical connection starting with amking of paint itself ( grinding the pigments etc) he’s talking here about the physicality of the process of painting and how the body becomes an instrument , an extension of the brush…. also about painting almost unconsciously .. in a dream state

 

6. Samyak Yamauchi- intuitive painte

 

7. Gina Stepaniuk

 

This artist uses interesting techniques and approach to paint nature – resonates with me and also goes along with idea i had about using my cooking to create colourful and abstract images.

8. Robert Motherwell – abstract, collage, intuitive painting, use of line/colour/techniques; expressive gesture marks; use of black and gesture is very interesting

https://nga.gov.au/Motherwell/

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Robert+Motherwell

next videos below have a lot of close ups of his work.

 

9. Synesthesia – use of colour as expression of seelings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia

 

10. aelita andre – abstract, sound/touch paintings

in above video:

Aelita talks about her Sound-Touch Paintings

Published on 3 May 2018

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Born out of her frustration that paintings are silent; mute, Aelita Andre was passionate about finding a way to make them express theselves sonically. This led to the development and creation of her sound-touch paintings where she combines touching the entire surface area of the painting with playing the painted and prepared violin and also using her voice, and combining all three into large scale improvised performances. She is now recognised as the founder of sound-touch painting – a revolutionary new art form fusing sound and painting, blending the latest technology with a centuries old art fom to reinvent painting – giving, for the first time, her canvases a voice. Aelita coaxes the sound of birds, oceans, rotating planets and the background radiation of the universe itself from the painting, breathing new life into her art, making her paintings ‘sing’. The genesis of the sound-touch painting was in 2013 during a live painting performance in the US, when Aelita spontaneosly placed a violin onto the painting and began playing it, making the sound of the violin an intrinsic part of the painting and the entire creative process.
11 – Samella Lewis
12 – francis Glenat

13.

abstract expressionist painter Anna Hryniewicz – very interesting how she explains her process

14. louise Bourgeois